The (scientific) art of tea blending

We embarked on this adventure with excited anticipation, brimming with ideas about translating cherished travel experiences into sensory ones. A few "interesting" concoctions later, we realised that this was going to be a journey all its own. The excitement and passion is definitely still there, but there really is an art to tea blending. A creatively fulfilling yet scientific art.

​Not all tea leaves are created equal, and neither are fruits, herbs, flavours and scents. Not only are there high notes, aftertastes and the finish on the palette to consider, but different sizes and flavour strengths (do you know how many rose petals amount to 5g compared to say, dried pineapple?!) As we have learned the hard way, there can be quite the difference between the smell and look of an ingredient or blend, and the taste!

A fantastic course we attended outlined the basics and dispelled some of the myths (eg what is in English Breakfast tea?), but our favourite parts were the blending challenges. Getting our hands dirty and experimenting with a smorgasbord of ingredients was an absolute dream. There are certainly some guidelines to keep in mind as some flavours seem to innately compliment each other , but ensuring balance, understanding what may overpower in scent and/or taste, and learning how herbs and fruits taste when steeped (not eaten); therein lies the secret to blending. We'll be the first to admit some flavours we "knew" would work, really sent us back to the drawing board yet at the same time, we have had the most wonderful surprises. 

We turned to tea blending as a way to express and share our wanderlust, yet our blending journey also inspires us to travel. There are so many amazing and exotic ingredients out there, we can't wait to get our hands on them. Just like most travel adventures, it is leading us to the unexpected, and the best things come from that. 

Join us in exploring the sensory side of wanderlust! 

 

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